Course Offerings

ECO 1010. Survey of Current Economic Issues (3).F;S.

Application of basic economic concepts in the analysis of current issues such as: unemployment, inflation, energy, pollution, poverty, government regulation, etc. Prerequisite: none.

ECO 1530–1549. Selected Topics (1–4). On Demand.

ECO 2030. Principles of Microeconomics (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience
A brief introduction to the study of economics followed by an in-depth analysis of microeconomics, including: the price mechanism and supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; cost and revenue analysis of the firm; market structures; factor markets and income distribution; market failure and the role of government; and current economic problems such as pollution, poverty and discrimination.

ECO 2040. Principles of Macroeconomics (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience
An in-depth analysis of macroeconomics including: aggregate economic measures; aggregate supply and demand analysis; economic fluctuations and growth; money, banking and credit; stabilization policy; problems such as unemployment, inflation and budget and trade deficits; and international trade and finance. Prerequisite: ECO 2030. (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

ECO 2100. Business and Economic Statistics I (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Quantitative Literacy
A study of statistical tools used to analyze business and economic problems. The major subject matter includes descriptive statistics, the concepts of probability, confidence intervals and hypothetical testing, and statistical comparisons of production and marketing methods. Prerequisite: MAT 1035 or MAT 1030 or MAT 1020. (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

ECO 2200. Business and Economic Statistics II (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Quantitative Literacy
Applications of statistical tools to a variety of business and economic situations. These tools include survey sampling methods, hypothesis testing using analysis of variance, regression and time-series analysis, and non-parametric statistics. Computer applications using current industry-standard statistical software programs are emphasized. Writing statistical reports is also emphasized. Prerequisites: ECO 2100 or STT 2810 or STT 2820. (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.)

ECO 2500. Independent Study (1–4).F;S.

ECO 2530–2549. Selected Topics (1–4). On Demand.

ECO 2620. Environmental and Resource Economics (3).S.
GEN ED: Social Science Designation; Liberal Studies Experience
The course explores the efficient allocation of environmental and natural resources and examines the continuing conflict between economic activity and environmental quality and the conservation of natural resources. The course applies economic theory to local, regional, national, and international environmental issues.

ECO 3010. Intermediate Price Theory (3).F;S.
An intermediate course in economic theory with emphasis on the theory of consumer behavior, price theory and resource allocation. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3020. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3).F;S.
An intermediate course in economic theory with emphasis on the analysis of the determinants of the nation’s income, output, employment, and general price level. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3070. Money and Banking (3).S.
An institutional and theoretical study of the structure and functioning of the central and commercial banking systems in the United States, money and monetary theory, the money and capital markets and financial intermediaries, and monetary policy. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3210. Economics of Sports (3).F.
Application of the techniques of microeconomic theory to the sports industry. These employ the tools of three core microeconomic fields - industrial organization, public finance, and labor economics - to the examination of professional and college sports. Topics studied include, but are not limited to, the prevalence of monopoly power in the sports industry, financing of stadiums and teams, growth of union power, salary determination, and the incidence of racial discrimination. Prerequisite: ECO 2030.

ECO 3410. International Trade (3).F;S.
A survey of the theory, development, and practice of the international trade and payments system. Special attention is given to the basic concepts and different mechanisms which have been and are used in international economic affairs, as well as to governmental policies and domestic and international institutions regulating them. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040. (Global Learning Opportunity course)

ECO 3430. Economic Growth and Development (3).F.
The course explores forces contributing to or retarding economic progress in developing countries, and it also focuses on the central questions of economic growth, including sources of income differences across countries, the causes of long-run growth, the linkages between trade and growth, and the process of economic development, including the role of institutions. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.(Global Learning Opportunity course)

ECO 3500. Independent Study (1–4).F;S.

ECO 3510. Junior Honors Thesis (1-3).On Demand.
Independent study and research project directed by a departmental faculty advisor on a topic of mutual interest to both student and advisor. The thesis should be completed during the student’s junior and senior years and includes a formal presentation to the college faculty. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

ECO 3520. Instructional Assistance (1).F;S.
A supervised experience in the instructional process on the university level through direct participation in a classroom situation. Graded on an S/U basis. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

ECO 3530-3549. Selected Topics (1–4). On Demand.
Topics covered have ranged from mathematical economics to economics of the law. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ECO 3550. Public Finance and Taxation (3). On Demand.
Economics analysis of government revenues and expenditures, impact of the government budget, shifting and incidence of taxation, public debt, fiscal policies. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3551. American Economic History (3).F.
Evolution of the American economy from colonial times through World War II. Emphasis is upon (1) the integration of African European and Native American economic activities into an interdependent system, (2) the spatial integration of diverse geographic regions into an integrated national economy, (3) the transition from a predominantly rural and agricultural economy into a mainly urban, industrial and commercial economy, (4) the Great Depression and the growth of government intervention in economic activity, (5) the changing balance between domestic and foreign commerce and (6) the role of war in American economic development. The methods of economic geography are combined with those of economic analysis to understand American history. Prerequisite: ECO 1010 or ECO 2030.

ECO 3610. Economics of Health Care (3).S.
Economic theory is applied to the health care industry. Included is an overall perspective of the health care industry, identification of the factors influencing the demand for and the supply of health care; identification of some costs and benefits of health programs, hospital organization and efficiency, and a consideration of alternative methods of financing health care. Prerequisite: ECO 2030 with a minimum grade of C-.

ECO 3630. History of Economic Thought (3).S.
Origin, development, and analysis of the major trends, contributions, and conflicts in the development of modern economic philosophy, analysis, and theory. Prerequisites: a minimum grade of “C” in any Writing in the Discipline (WID) course, ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3650. Industrial Organization and Public Policy Toward Business (3). On Demand.
A study of the structure of firms and markets and of their interactions. It first considers the basics of competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition. It then considers the “new industrial organization” which includes topics such as strategic behavior, price discrimination, nonlinear pricing, vertical integration and vertical restrictions, information, advertising, and government policies and their effects. Prerequisites: ECO 2030, ECO 2040 and MAT 1035 or MAT 1030 or equivalent.

ECO 3680. Experimental and Behavioral Economics (3).S.
An experimental science approach to studying human behavior. Controlled experiments are used to explore how individuals and groups behave in a variety of decision environments. Psychological influences on behavior are also addressed. Topics include, but are not limited to: ethical treatment of human subjects, market experiments, individual decision-making, risk and choice, behavioral game theory, and neuroeconomics. Prerequisite: ECO 2030.

ECO 3710. Managerial Economics (3).S.
Use of statistical and mathematical concepts and techniques in solving problems in economics. Microeconomic theory is reviewed and optimizing techniques are used in decision making. Prerequisites: ECO 2030, ECO 2040 and ECO 2100 or equivalent.

ECO 3720. Economics of Personnel (3).S.
Application of economic analysis to personnel issues. Topics include hiring, training, the method of pay, and motivation and evaluation of workers. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3730. Econometrics (3).F.
The course studies the use of statistical methods to estimate and test models in economics, business, and the social sciences. The focus of the course is on multiple regression models and their estimation with computer software. Additional topics covered may include panel data, limited dependent variables, instrumental variables, and time series models. Prerequisites: ECO 2030, ECO 2040, and ECO 2200, or permission of the instructor.

ECO 3800. Urban and Regional Economics (3). On Demand.
An examination of the institutional background necessary for urban and regional growth. An introduction to theoretical models of growth. Prerequisites: ECO 2030 and ECO 2040.

ECO 3900. Internship (6 or 9).F;S.
A full-time work experience in business. Nine semester hours of credit are granted for a normal 15-week internship with six semester hours granted for a 10-week internship. Students are encouraged to do internships during the summer between their junior and senior years of study. Prerequisites: admission to the Walker College of Business or the College of Arts and Sciences, and permission of the departmental chair and the internship coordinator. Graded on an S/U basis.

ECO 4500. Independent Study (1–4).F;S.

ECO 4510. Senior Honors Thesis (1-3).On Demand.
Independent study and research project directed by a departmental faculty advisor on a topic of mutual interest to both student and advisor. The thesis should be completed during the student’s junior and senior years and includes a formal presentation to the college faculty. May be repeated for a total credit of three semester hours.

ECO 4530–4549. Selected Topics (1–4).On Demand.

ECO 4621. Environmental Economics and Policy (3).S.
Analysis of the interrelationships among economic activity, government policies, and the environment; the benefits and costs of economic growth; the economics of environmental quality; the social costs of pollution; and the intertemporal allocation of natural resources. Prerequisites: a minimum grade of “C” in any Writing in the Discipline (WID) course, and ECO 2030 or ECO 2620. [Duallisted with ECO 5621.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing.

ECO 4640. International Macroeconomics (3).F.
This course aims to provide a basic knowledge of how international financial markets work. It is a combination of lectures and discussions covering theory and real-world policies, events, and evidence. The course can be broadly divided into three parts – foreign exchange markets, international financial transactions, and economic policies. The first part focuses on exchange rate behavior, foreign exchange rate markets, and the determinants of the exchange rates. The second part of the course studies international financial transactions in a global macroeconomy. The goal of the last part of the course is to understand how the choices governments make about monetary and fiscal policies, or about exchange rate regime and capital mobility, affect economic outcomes, and why crises occur. Prerequisites: a minimum grade of “C” in any Writing in the Discipline (WID) course and ECO 2040. [Dual-listed with ECO 5640.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing.

ECO 4660. Benefit-Cost Analysis (3).F.
The study of the evaluation of competing public policy alternatives. The purpose of benefit-cost analysis is to inform government decision-making and facilitate the more efficient allocation of scarce resources. This course introduces the basic theory and principles of benefit-cost analysis and examines applications of the methodology. Prerequisites: a minimum grade of “C” in any Writing in the Discipline (WID) course, and ECO 2030. [Dual-listed with ECO 5660.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing.

ECO 4740. Forecasting and Time Series Models (3).On Demand.
An examination of time series models for purposes of forecasting and performing time series regressions in economics, business, and the social sciences. Topics covered may include ARIMA, VAR, Granger causality, unit roots, spurious regressions, ARCH, and GARCH. Computer software will be utilized in applications. Prerequisites: a minimum grade of “C” in any Writing in the Discipline (WID) course, and ECO 2200 or permission of the instructor. (ND Prerequisite: passing the math placement test or successful completion of MAT 0010.) [Dual-listed with ECO 5740.] Dual-listed courses require senior standing.

ECO 4810. Seminar in Economics (3).F;S.
GEN ED: Capstone Experience
In-depth research and analysis of selected economic issues and problems. Required of all seniors majoring in economics or banking. Students participate in discussions of significant economic problems, theories and policies. Preparation of empirical papers that apply theoretical models and quantitative methods is required. These papers will be presented orally and in writing to the seminar participants. Prerequisites: a minimum grade of “C” in any Writing in the Discipline (WID) course, ECO 3010, ECO 3020, and senior standing.

ECO 5150. Business Economics (3).F. 
Intensive study of economic decision techniques for management. Topics include estimation of demand and cost function, analysis of economic forecasts and business cycles, analysis of price and non-price competition, allocation and distributional effects of regulation, taxation, and fiscal and monetary policy, cost-benefit and cost effectiveness analyses for the not-for-profit sector. Primary emphasis will be placed on the understanding and application, rather than the theoretical and computational aspects, of these techniques. Prerequisite: admission to the MBA Program or permission approved by the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International Programs in the Walker College of Business.

 ECO 5500. Independent Study (1-4).F;S.

 ECO 5530-5549. Selected Topics (1-4).F;S.

 ECO 5621. Environmental Economics and Policy (3).S.
Analysis of the interrelationships among economic activity, government policies, and the environment; the benefits and costs of economic growth; the economics of environmental quality; the social costs of pollution; and the intertemporal allocation of natural resources. Prerequisite: ECO 2030 (Principles of Microeconomics) or ECO 2620 (Environmental and Resource Economics). [Dual-listed with ECO 4621.]

 ECO 5640. International Macroeconomics (3).On Demand.
This course aims to provide a basic knowledge of how international financial markets work. It is a combination of lectures and discussions covering theory and real-world policies, events, and evidence. The course can be broadly divided into three parts – foreign exchange markets, international financial transactions, and economic policies. The first part focuses on exchange rate behavior, foreign exchange rate markets, and the determinants of the exchange rates. The second part of the course studies international financial transactions in a global macroeconomy. The goal of the last part of the course is to understand how the choices governments make about monetary and fiscal policies, or about exchange rate regime and capital mobility, affect economic outcomes, and why crises occur. Prerequisites: ECO 2040 (Principles of Macroeconomics). [Dual-listed with ECO 4640.]

 ECO 5660. Benefit-Cost Analysis (3).F.
The study of the evaluation of competing public policy alternatives. The purpose of benefit-cost analysis is to inform government decision-making and facilitate the more efficient allocation of scarce resources. This course introduces the basic theory and principles of benefit-cost analysis and examines applications of the methodology. Prerequisite: ECO 2030 (Principles of Economics - Price Theory). [Dual-listed with ECO 4660].

ECO 5740. Forecasting and Time Series Models (3).On Demand.
An examination of time series models for purposes of forecasting and performing time series regressions in economics, business, and the social sciences. Topics covered may include ARIMA, VAR, Granger causality, unit roots, spurious regressions, ARCH, and GARCH. Computer software will be utilized in applications. Prerequisite: ECO 2200 (Business and Economic Statistics II) or permission of the instructor. [Dual-listed with ECO 4740.]

 ECO 5989. Graduate Research (1-9).F;S.
This course is designed to provide access to University facilities for continuing graduate research at the master's and specialist's levels. Graded on an S/U basis. ECO 5989 does not count toward a degree.